There are two ways of constructing a software design: One way is to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies, and the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies. The first method is far more difficult. — C.A.R. Hoare


TAR via XKCD

Algorithms This page contains all my lecture notes for the algorithms classes required for all computer science undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. I have taught incarnations of this course eight times: Spring 1999, Fall 2000, Spring 2001, Fall 2002, Spring 2004, Fall 2005, Fall 2006, Spring 2007, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. These notes are numbered roughly in the order I use them in my undergraduate class.

100 Vim Commands Every Programmer Should Know Since the 70′s, Vi is one of the programmer’s best friend. Nevermind you’re new to Vi or not, here’s a big list of 100 useful commands, organized by topic, which will make your coder life better.

Learning JavaScript Design Patterns Design patterns are reusable solutions to commonly occurring problems in software design. They are both exciting and a fascinating topic to explore in any programming language. One reason for this is that they help us build upon the combined experience of many developers that came before us and ensure we structure our code in an optimized way, meeting the needs of problems we’re attempting to solve… In this book we will explore applying both classical and modern design patterns to the JavaScript programming language.

Out of the Tar Pit Complexity is the single major difficulty in the successful development of large-scale software systems. Following Brooks we distinguish accidental from essential difficulty, but disagree with his premise that most complexity remaining in contemporary systems is essential. We identify common causes of complexity and discuss general approaches which can be taken to eliminate them where they are accidental in nature. To make things more concrete we then give an outline for a potential complexity-minimizing approach based on functional programming and Codd’s relational model of data.

Practicing Ruby Practicing Ruby articles are jam-packed with meaningful code samples and clear explanations that help you level up your programming skills. Since 2010, our carefully designed content has helped countless Ruby programmers get better at their craft in a fun and efficient way.

Bjarne Stroustrup: The 5 Programming Languages You Need to Know

Nobody should call themselves a professional if they only knew one language.

Type Theory and Functional Programming Constructive Type theory has been a topic of research interest to computer scientists, mathematicians, logicians and philosophers for a number of years. For computer scientists it provides a framework which brings together logic and programming languages in a most elegant and fertile way: program development and verification can proceed within a single system. Viewed in a different way, type theory is a functional programming language with some novel features, such as the totality of all its functions, its expressive type system allowing functions whose result type depends upon the value of its input, and sophisticated modules and abstract types whose interfaces can contain logical assertions as well as signature information. A third point of view emphasizes that programs (or functions) can be extracted from proofs in the logic.

Principles of Docking: An Overview of Search Algorithms and a Guide to Scoring Functions The docking field has come of age. The time is ripe to present the principles of docking, reviewing the current state of the field. Two reasons are largely responsible for the maturity of the computational docking area. First, the early optimism that the very presence of the “correct” native conformation within the list of predicted docked conformations signals a near solution to the docking problem, has been replaced by the stark realization of the extreme difficulty of the next scoring/ranking step. Second, in the last couple of years more realistic approaches to handling molecular flexibility in docking schemes have emerged.

Humble Little Ruby Book Ruby is an open-source, multi-paradigm, interpreted programming language (a bit of a mouthful I know! I’m going to explain it, I promise!). Ruby was created by Yukihiro “Matz” Matsumoto, a very fine Japanese gentleman who currently resides in Shimane Prefecture, Japan; Matz’s work on the language was started on February 24, 1993 (commonly considered the birthday of the language; I hear that over in Japan they roll out a two-story cake and sing) and released to the public in 1995. Ruby is often hailed as one the most expressive and concise languages available to developers today. In that spirit of expressiveness, let’s look at exactly what it all means. Let us now eviscerate these verbal furbelows with conviction!

The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!) Ever wonder about that mysterious Content-Type tag? You know, the one you’re supposed to put in HTML and you never quite know what it should be? Did you ever get an email from your friends in Bulgaria with the subject line “???? ?????? ??? ????”? I’ve been dismayed to discover just how many software developers aren’t really completely up to speed on the mysterious world of character sets, encodings, Unicode, all that stuff.

Fundamental Concepts in Programming Languages This paper forms the substance of a course of lectures given at the International Summer School in Computer Programming at Copenhagen in August, 1967. The lectures were originally given from notes and the paper was written after the course was finished. In spite of this, and only partly because of the shortage of time, the paper still retains many of the shortcomings of a lecture course. The chief of these are an uncertainty of aim—it is never quite clear what sort of audience there will be for such lectures—and an associated switching from formal to informal modes of presentation which may well be less acceptable in print than it is natural in the lecture room. For these (and other) faults, I apologise to the reader.

CSS3 Cheat Sheet In this post we present a printable CSS 3 Cheat Sheet (PDF), a complete listing of all the properties, selectors types and allowed values in the current CSS 3 specification from the W3C. Each property is provided in a section that attempts to match it with the section (module) that it is most actively associated within the W3C specification. Next to each property is a listing of the expected values that that property takes (normal text shows named values it accepts and italics shows value types it will accept).

Dynamo: amazon’s highly available key-value store Reliability at massive scale is one of the biggest challenges we face at Amazon.com, one of the largest e-commerce operations in the world; even the slightest outage has significant financial consequences and impacts customer trust. The Amazon.com platform, which provides services for many web sites worldwide, is implemented on top of an infrastructure of tens of thousands of servers and network components located in many datacenters around the world. At this scale, small and large components fail continuously and the way persistent state is managed in the face of these failures drives th